31 Flavors of Noir on the Fringe to Lure you in! Part 2

By now with Part 1 and 2 under my belt it’s pretty clear that one theme has emerged. It is my love for three shamefully underrated noir actors that really carry the genre, John Garfield, Victure Mature and Richard Conte! Victor Mature is a swarthy jewel in his darker noirs, The Long Haul, I Wake Up Screaming and Kiss of Death. Even in the western noir masterpiece My Darling Clementine 1946 where he plays the brooding Doc Holliday. Conte possesses a sublime brutality, with the lure of a Minotaur charging. Think of him In The Big Combo, Thieves’ Highway, and Brothers Rico. And Garfield is deeply vulnerable and edgy, giving off an existential sensuality as in He Ran All the Way, Force of Evil, Body and Soul, and They Made Me a Criminal. I think I’ve fallen in love with all three!

JUST A HEADS UP: THERE ARE SPOILERS!

12-Cry of the City 1948

From the heart of its people comes the … cry of the city.

Directed by Robert Siodmak (The Killers 1946 , Phantom Lady 1944, The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry 1945, The Spiral Staircase 1946, The File on Thelma Jordon 1949) with a screenplay by Richard Murphy from the novel The Chair for Martin Rome by Henry Edward Helseth, and an uncredited Ben Hecht.

Editorial use only.No book cover usage. Mandatory Credit: Photo by 20th Century Fox/Kobal/Shutterstock (5876973e)
Robert Siodmak, Victor Mature Cry Of The City 1948 Director: Robert Siodmak 20th Century Fox USA On/Off Set La Proie

The moody black and white photography is by cinematographer Lloyd Ahern Sr. and music by Alfred Newman. Eddie Muller refers to Cry of the City as “Siodmak’s most operatic noir.” It is Siodmak’s most focused work, and the first film noir he shot extensively on location. The film reunited Siodmak with producer Sol Siegel who worked on three Paramount B pictures together after the director settled in Hollywood during the early 1940s. The song ‘Street Scene’, a recurring motif heard in several noirs and written by composer Alfred Newman, plays at the opening of the film. The song can be remembered in I Wake Up Screaming, also starring Mature. It is an urban melody that evokes dreamy nightscapes of the city. Siodmak loves a rain soaked street in his noir films, with it’s themes of fatalism and obsession, and the shocking story of the clash between law and lawlessness. The story borrows from a familiar plot device which sets up an opposition between two characters who come from the same background as children, but wind up clashing in their adult life.

Cry of the City is the most ‘operatic’ (Muller) film noir not just stylistically, but the theme its essential that you not hate Marty Rome’s character. The whole idea is that these are two boyhood friends who come from the same neighborhood and it’s just through circumstance one becomes a criminal and one a lawman, but they’re basically the same guy. That’s the whole point of the film. It’s essential that he play someone with that swagger (Conte) and that criminal intent, but he also has a vulnerability you can see in both of them. You can see the boy in the man. It ends so tragically that it feels operatic…You could see that Siodmak is using the street like this huge stage”

Cry of the City stars Victor Mature as Lt. Vittorio Candella, and Richard Conte as the ruthless Marty Rome. Fred Clark plays Cadnella’s partner Lt. Jim Collins whose tongue is fast on the trigger. Shelley Winters is Marty’s old flame Brenda Martingale. Brenda is Martin’s loyal ex-gal who spirits the wounded Conte around the city, while an unlicensed doctor works on his bullet wounds in the back seat of her car.

Betty Garde is Nurse Frances Pruett, and Berry Kroeger is the unsavory, amoral lawyer W. A. Niles. Debra Paget plays angelic Teena Riconti. Tommy Cook plays Conte’s cop hating kid brother who worships him, and it’s clear is heading down the same doomed path, as hi older brother Marty.

Garde and Emerson worked together in John Cromwell’s Caged 1950. Garde is Conte’s sympathetic nurse And Hope Emerson as the darkly imposing Rose Given. Emerson, a masseuse and a sadist, is the nefarious Amazon who desperately wants the jewels that Conte has lifted from sleazy lawyer Kroeger. One of the best supporting roles in Cry of the City is Hope Emerson as the ‘monolithic’ (Dinman) Rose Givens who dominates the scenes with Conte.

In Robert Siodmak’s sublime noir Cry of the City 1948 Emerson plays Madame Rose Given who runs a massage parlor, loves to cook, is a pancake eatin’ -looming ‘heavy’… who loves jewels and just wants a little place in the country where she can cook, eat pancakes and fresh eggs… ‘yeah that’s livin’. From her brawny swagger to her grumbling yet leisurely voice, Emerson’s delicsiouly diabolical performance is the highlight of the film!

Continue reading “31 Flavors of Noir on the Fringe to Lure you in! Part 2”

31 Flavors of Noir on the Fringe to Lure You In! Part 1

“A man could spend the rest of his life trying to remember what he shouldn’t have said.”- Force of Evil

“All that Cain did to Abel was murder him.” –Force of Evil

“He pushed me too far!… So I pushed him just far enough.” –The Lineup

“You’re like a rat in a box without any holes” – I Wake Up Screaming

“From now on, no one cuts me so deep that I can’t close the wound.” – I Wake Up Screaming

“I’m gonna give you a break. I’m gonna fix it so you don’t hear the bullets!”- The Big Combo

“I was born on a Monday, I might as well go out on a Monday. Like dirty laundry.”- Man in the Dark 

Heads up… this feature includes spoilers…💣

1-I Wake Up Screaming 1941

I Wake Up Screaming is the first official noir produced by Fox, directed by H. Bruce Humberstone (he worked on Charlie Chan programmers and B-movies) who was not considered a noir director. With a screenplay by Dwight Taylor based on the novel by Steve Fisher. Eddie Muller said it personified film noir, and calls the 1941 film – Proto-noir, as it was the first of it’s kind.

Darryl F. Zanuck wanted the film’s location changed to New York City, so it wouldn’t reflect badly on L.A. There are a number of sleazy characters involved and he wanted to shift the story from Hollywood to Broadway.

The film was remade as Vicki in 1953 (with Jeanne Crane and Jean Peters, though it lacked the highly stylized artistry) Photographed by Edward Cronjager (Seven Keys to Baldpate 1929, Hell’s Highway 1932, The Monkey’s Paw 1933, Island in the Sky 1938, The Gorilla 1939, Heaven Can Wait 1943, Desert Fury 1947, Relentless 1948, House by the River 1950, The Girl in Lovers Lane 1960) pours out murky noir shadows, darkened streets, unusual camera angles, low key lighting and the high contrast, onepoint lighting that illuminates the ink black threatening spaces. The film is stark yet dynamic.

With music by Cyril J. Mockridge, you’ll hear the familiar often used noir leitmotif, the melody Street Scene by Alfred Newman. I Wake Up Screaming stars Betty Grable as Jill Lynn, Victor Mature as Frankie Christopher, Carole Landis as Vicki Lynn, Laird Cregar as Ed Cornell. The film also co-stars Alan Mowbray as Robin Ray and Allyn Joslyn as Larry Evans. Quirky character actor Elisha Cook Jr. plays Harry Williams the desk clerk in Vicki’s apartment building who’s a real weirdo. William Gargan plays Detective Jerry ‘Mac’ MacDonald.

Cook is great at playing quirky oddballs (Cliff the crazed drummer in Phantom Lady 1944, George Peatty in The Killing 1956, anxious trench coat wearing Wilmer in The Maltese Falcon 1941, Watson Pritchard in House on Haunted Hill 1959).

I Wake up Screaming bares a resemblance to a whodunit, as the killer is chased down with the story playing a bit of a shell game with us. There are common noir themes of obsession, perverse lust, corruption and homicidal jealousy. The film is also has a preoccupation with images and artifice, tossing up flashbacks like a circus juggler.

Right before model Vicki Lynn heads to Hollywood to reach for her rising star, she is brutally murdered. Delicious Betty Grable in her first non-music role, plays Jill Lynn, Vicki’s sister, who is drawn to the man (Victor Mature) who is presumably her sister’s murderer.

Vicki functions as an essential part of the narrative early on in the film and is resurrected by way of flashbacks. Frankie knows that while there are images that still exist of Vicki she is no longer present. In fact Vicki is a myth and a manufactured deception in some ways. Jill on the other hand is genuine, unpretentious and warmhearted.

Carol Landis who died at 28 from an overdose, plays murder victim Vicki Lynn. I Wake up Screaming back flips into the weeks leading up to her death. The film is also somewhat of a noir variation on Pygmalion, as Victor Mature who plays Frankie Christopher, sports and show business promoter, discovers a beautiful girl waiting tables and gets the hot idea of turning Vicki into a celebrity and society girl. Vicki’s appeal, is the sphere of influence that drives the plot. Mature always makes the screen sweat with his sexy brawny build, swarthy good looks, strong jaw line and the aura of his glistening obsidian hair.

The film opens with a sensational news headline ‘MODEL MURDERED’ right from the top Frankie is being grilled by the cops in the interrogation room. Burning white hot lights are up close in his face. He says to the shadow of Cornell (Cregar) who’s a bulky shadow shot with single source lighting) to his opaque figure, “You’re a pretty tough guy with a crowd around.”

The flashbacks begin. Frankie goes back to the first time he meets Vicki at the lunch room on 8th Avenue while eating with Larry Evans (Alan Joslyn) and Robin Ray (Alan Mowbray). Vicki asks “Is that all?” Lary Evans says “No, but the rest of it isn’t on the menu.” She handles his come on, “You couldn’t afford it if it was.” Frankie pours on the charm. He gets the notion to take Vicki and mold her into a celebrity. “You know I bet in 6 months I could take that girl and put her on top of the ladder.” Mature and Landis worked together in One Million Years B.C.

Has-been actor Robin Ray (Mowbray) and ruthless gossip columnist Larry Evans (Joslyn) decide to get involved in developing Vicki Lynn’s mystique and cultivate her glamour on the road to fame. Of course both men wind up having a yen for her. A cynical Ray (Mowbray) complains that all women are alike. Evans (Joslyn) tells him,“For Pete’s sake, what difference does that make? You’ve got to have them. They’re standard equipment.”

Frankie takes Vicki Lynn out into New York cafe society – All three schemers, the columnist, the washed up actor and Frankie, bring her to the cafe and make a big noise, grabbing the attention of Lady Handel (May Beatty) who invites them over to her table. In order give the impression that Vicki will now be a new sensation, Larry Evans brags in front of the table, that he’ll plug her In his column. They also think that it’ll help Vicki to get noticed if she’s seen on Robin Ray’s arm. The outing is a success. When they bring her home to her apartment building they meet the squirrly desk clerk Harry Williams (Elisha Cook), who takes his sweet time, getting up for Vicki. Frankie gives him a hard time after being so disrespectful. Williams sneers, “She ain’t nobody.”

Back to the present and Frankie’s still in the sweat box. They’re questioning Jill too. She’s telling the cops about Vicki’s plans. She’s got, “Grand ideas about becoming a celebrity.” They ask about Frankie’s involvement. Another flashback – the sisters are talking about Vicki’s new venture. Vicki tells Jill, “They’re gonna glamorize me.” Jill tells Vicki that she doesn’t trust Frankie’s promises, and apologizes for sounding stuffy. She warns Vicki about having unrealistic aspirations. Flashback even further. Frankie shows up at the cafeteria. Vicki keeps dishing out the wise cracks. He shows her the newspaper article about her making a splash at the El Chico Club.

“Why all the cracks you don’t even know me?” “I don’t know anything about art, but I know what I like.” Back at the present day, at the police station. Jill continues to tell the cops how successful Vicki’s climb was. Backwards once again-

Jill Lynn I don’t want to tell you your business, but don’t you think you’re making a fool of yourself?
Vicki Lynn What do you mean?
Jill Oh, this Frankie Christopher. People like that, what have they got to do with people like us?
Vicki Jill, they’re going to help me!
Jill In what way?
Vicki They’re gonna’ glamorize me. They may have started this thing as a gag, but, after taking one look at those million-dollar debutantes tonight, I realized I can give them cards in spades and still come out on top.
Jill Vicky, you’ll never come out on top by any shortcuts. One week your picture’s on the cover of a magazine, the next it’s in the ash can.

Frankie arrives at the girls apartment, and Vicki breaks the news to Frankie that she’s going away to Hollywood. She’d done a screen test and signed a long term contract. He’s angry. She went behind Frankie’s back after everything he did for her. She defends herself “Some people think I’m a pretty attractive girl. I’m no Frankenstein you know!” Frankie comments, “I wonder.”

Jill tells the cops she was pounding a typewriter breaking her finger nails, and Vicki did get the Hollywood contract, so she might have been right about taking the risk with an acting career and becoming a star.

Another flashback The three men are sitting around the bar..

Robin Ray [indignant] Can you imagine her walking out on me, after all that I’ve done for her? Me!

Larry Evans [slightly incredulous] “You’ve” done for her? What have *you* done for her?

Robin Well, I took her out to all the bright spots, I let her be seen with me everywhere… It made her feel important.

Larry Why, you parboiled old ham! You don’t think anybody thought there was anything between *you* two, do you? If it hadn’t been for my plugging in the column, people would’ve thought she was your trained nurse.

Robin Why, you ink-stinking word slinger! I was famous when they were changing your pants 20 times a day!

Jumping to the present again, Jill is still being questioned by the cops. They want to know if Vicki had anyone in her life. Jill remembers a peculiar thing that happened. She tells them she was sitting at the table in the cafeteria waiting for Vicki to get off work. The peeping prowling, Ed Cornell’s giant shape stares at Vicki through the window. He has a queer look on his face. Jill maintains her stare, holding her coffee cup, she is unable to put it down as she studies him, uncomfortably. Once he notices Jill catching him ogling Vicki, he skulks away. Mockeridge’s score undergoes a sinister change, emphasis on the rhythmic accents of a classic horror picture.

Jill tells her sister, “You seem to have an admirer there’s some guy looking through the window like the wolf looking for the 3 little pigs.” The girls are walking on the street, Cornell is leaning against a wall, Jill points out to Vicki that he’s the one. “He gives me the creeps” Vicki says, “You’ll have to get used to that, they’ve got more wolves in New York than they have in Siberia” She tells the cops she saw him several times after in odd places. He never said anything but watched Vicki, it frightened Jill. There was something strange about him, the way he looked at Vicki. Always turning up in strange places. The cops look skeptical about her “mysterious stranger.”

The cops think Jill is trying to protect Frankie “I just don’t believe he did it, that’s all” They ask if she’s involved with him, and accuse her of being in love with him and wanting Vicki out of the way. Jill demands to see someone in authority, so they tell Mac to get Cornell. Who walks in? The creep who watched Vicki through the plate glass!

Enter rabid, self-righteous homicide Detective Ed Cornell (Cregar). Once he sets his sights on Frankie he begins to mercilessly hound him to the ends of hell if necessary, going after him with a flaming vengeance, trying to pin the murder on him. Cornell knows that Frankie is innocent but he is determined to persecute him. Cregar made an all too short career out playing imposing characters. He died at 28 in 1944 due to complications from a crash diet, always struggling with his weight, striving to obtain leading man status.

Jill is startled, the room is smoky and this massive shape looms over her with his girth “That’s him, that’s the man!” They think she’s crazy. First it’s a mysterious stranger peeking through windows and now it’s Ed Cornell. “Thats my job to look at people.” Leaving the dark corner of the sweat box into the smoke factory with Frankie, things become more visible as Cornell emerges as a menacing force. She insists, “I did see you.” “Alright Alright I’m a peeping tom.”

Jill Relates what happened on the car ride with Frankie, the night he learned Vicki was leaving, and she tells him he’ll be glad to get rid of her, because Jill is in love with him. That Jill is just covering up her feelings. Frankie says Jill being in love with him, never entered his mind. Vicki is sure, “I know it’s much deeper than that. That’s why its so dangerous. Anything might happen.”

Cornell writes down everything in his pad. Jill says that Vicki didn’t mean the line about being glad to get rid of her, but he corrects her, “What she meant doesn’t count. It’s what she said.”

The night Jill found Vicki, as soon as she came out of the elevator she got a feeling something was wrong. There was  music blasting from the radio. Frankie was there already – ”Jill you don’t think I did it, do you?” Jill is in shock.

Cornell goes back into the interrogation room with Frankie and tells him he knows about Vicki’s ‘get rid of me’ statement. The obessed Cornell comes up with a scenario. Frankie’s mind got more and more inflamed with jealousy and hurt pride. Went up there and killed her in cold blood. Cornell loses his cool and lunges at Frankie, ”I’ve got a mind to kill you right now.”When Cornell gets rough, the other cops have to break it up. They all like Frankie and ask if he’s got any tickets to the fights. They ask Cornell “What’s the idea of riding him, so hard?” “I have years of experience in this racket. If that isn’t the look of a guilty man, I’ll take the rap myself.” The District Attorney winds up getting his back up with Cornell when he focuses so much on Frankie’s guilt.

The District Attorney (Morris Ankrum) apologizes to Frankie. Jill is in the office too, and tells him they think they know the identity of the killer. It’s the switchboard operator at the sisters’ apartment building. They think it’s Harry Williams. Jill leaves the police station and Frankie asks why they think it’s Williams. The D.A. tells him, William’s been missing since 5pm last night, probably hiding out scared and shaky.

Frankie is released and later that night, Mature wakes up to find the huge, menacing Cregar sitting beside his bed, “Well that’s the first time, I had a bad dream with my eyes open.” “Someday you’re going to talk in your sleep, and when that days comes I want to be around.” The scene hints at Cornell’s repressed homosexual passion.

Cornell tells him he’ll get all the evidence he needs and tie him up like a pig in a slaughter house. Frankie unrattled, tells him, ”You’re the bright boy” and reminds him that they think Williams murdered Vicki. Victor Mature is so smooth, so mellow when he’s playing at being sarcastic, He says, “You’re like something out of a museum you ought to have a magnifying glass and one of those trick hats with the ear flaps” Frankie throws Cornell out after he calls him cocky, and has had it his way too long. First with Vicki, then Jill. Cornell’s resentment is showing.

Jill finds Harry Williams who’s returned to the apartment building. She’s moving out, but he has already packed up her bags and taken them down to the lobby. Williams is a suspiciously hollow little insect who Jill finds strange. Frankie meets up with Robin at the police station. The cops show a reel of Vicki singing at a night club. Cornell watches her longingly which gives Frankie a window into Cornell’s longing for the dead girl. Cornell looks at Frankie with contempt.

The film of Vicki appears in the dark room filled with cigar smoke that makes wispy clouds float, and the rays of light from the projection booth. The light cast on Frankie’s eyes are like an illuminated mask, it accentuates his epiphany — that Cornell is obsessed with Vicki. He catches something in his stare. The light on Cornell’s face as HE stares back at Frankie, unmasks only half of his face, revealing the duplicity Cornell projects throughout the picture. It’s a brilliantly framed shot by Cronjager.

The film reel resurrects Vicki from the dead, like a ghost haunting the room. Robin Ray squirms in his chair and runs to get out. The door is locked. His behavior hints at his guilt. They put the lights on and bring him into the D.A.’s office. Ray tells them how he felt about her. She laughed at him. Called him “a has-been and didn’t want to hitch her wagon to a falling star.” He’s the one that arranged the screen test but she went down there alone. He is obsolete, they decided they didn’t need him. While he talks about her, Cornell looks out the window. Daylight casts patterns from the venetian blinds that cut across his face. Odd angle profiles tilt the two-shot of Cornell and Mac off kilter. Ray has an alibi. He was at a sanitarium. Cornell checked it out already and is gleeful that it rules out yet another suspect. He wants Frankie to fry for it. Cornell would have Frankie in the death house by now. “That won’t prevent you from going to the hot chair.” 

As Frankie is leaving the police station Cornell asks him for a lift uptown “Sure, always happy to oblige a goon”

Ed Cornell [bumming a ride in Frankie’s car] “I’m sorry to have to ask you to do this, but I’m a little short on cash lately. You see, I’ve spent so much of my own dough, trying to build up this case against you.”

Frankie Christopher (Victor Mature) Well, if there’s anything you need, just let me know.”

Ed Cornell Oh, I imagine they’ll make it right with me when I bring in the material for your trial. They usually do in these cases. I nick a guy on my own time and send him up to the chair, then I get back pay.”

Frankie Christopher “Must be a great life – like a garbage man, only with people!”

Ed Cornell “I got practically all the evidence I need now. I could arrest you today for that matter, but you might get some smart mouthpiece and get off with life instead of the chair. I won’t be satisfied until I’m *sure* it’s the chair.”

Frankie Christopher “You’re a gay dog, Cornell. You make me feel as if I’m driving a hearse!”

Ed Cornell Oh, I know your type. I’ve seen hundreds of them. I don’t scare you enough to make you commit suicide, but I worry you just the same. And when the day comes they all act different. Some scream, a few faint, some light a cigarette and try a wisecrack. But it sticks in their throats – especially when they’re hung.”

Cornell shows up at Jill’s new apartment to intimidate her. Jill “What’s the good of living without hope?” Ed Cornell signals his own personal torture- “It can be done.” He advises her to just play along, insisting that she’s not even sure Frankie’s innocent. Once he’s left, Jill pulls out a note from behind a framed painting on the wall. It’s from Frankie to Vicki, “After what you did last night, the sooner you’re out of the way the better it will be.”

Frankie takes Jill to the fights and then out on the town. She asks if he ever brought Vicki to the fights, and tells him it’s the first New York night club she’s ever been to. The El Chico club, he first took Vicki to. She sees how nice he is without all the flashy bluster and pretense. He’s actually very real. Cornell follows them. Frankie asks her why she suddenly called him, “The trouble with you is that you pretend you don’t care about things but you do. You were very upset about Vicki’s death weren’t You? He tells her he’d like to find the guy, “Save the State on it’s electric bill. She was a good kid” Jill doesn’t want him to be guilty. “Did you love her? “No, do you think if I’d loved her I would have tried to exploit her the way I did?… Vicki was pretty, gay and amusing She had lots to offer and I wanted to put her in the right place on the map. After all that’s my business But when a man really loves a woman, he doesn’t want to plaster her face all over papers and magazines. He wants to keep her to himself.”

Looking into her eyes, he tells her he’s in love with her. Larry Evans sees them together and calls in the story “Stepping out… Dancing on the grave.”

Frankie takes Jill to his favorite swimming spot. It’s a lovely scene, that brings some lightness to the external space in the story. She shows him the note he wrote to Vickie and he asks why she didn’t turn it into the police. Jill tells him she knew he was innocent and what the note meant, at the moment they were dancing at the nightclub. When they are back at the apartment, Cornell walks in and takes the note. They cuff Frankie. Cornell who is obviously framing him is just waiting for the chance to catch him. Frankie tells him anyone could have written a note like that. He was burned up when Vicki dropped the bomb that she was leaving. He finds out that Cornell has planted a set of brass knuckles in his apartment. Vicki was hit hard behind the ear with a heavy object. The depraved Cornell punches Frankie in the guts. “You’re like a rat in a hole.”

As Cornell is about to take him downtown, Frankie on the ground after Cornell’s hostile assault, Jill hits Cornell from behind, and helps Frankie escape. Big fat head bullying him, she says.

Frankie proposes, “Mind marrying a hunted man?” She tells him, “Most married men have a hunted look anyway.” He tells her his real name – Botticelli, the son of Italian immigrants. Then he shows her how to hide in the city. They duck into in an adult movie house, watching the same picture over and over. Then they decide to split up for the time being and she goes to the public library. The cops find her, and Frankie sees them taking her away. The newspaper headline says “Christopher eludes police dragnet.” Cornell stalks the streets. Frankie sneaks up on him. “Let Jill go”, and he’ll turn himself in. Ed Cornell (Laird Cregar) “I’ll follow you into your grave. I’ll write my name on your tombstone.” “You’re not a cop you’re crazy trying to frame an innocent man.” Frankie throws a tootsie roll at him and takes off. Cornell assures him, he’ll eventually get him. Always smirking like the devil.

Cornell tells the D.A. a parable about the African Butterfly and how to trap the male is to let the female free. He wants him to let Jill out of her box to lure Frankie. She goes home, sneaks out through the window, and surprises Frankie at the adult movie house. At the apartment she has found little cards from flowers that were sent to Vicki, and at the funeral. She shows them to Frankie. The message on the cards say, “Because I promised.”

They go to Rosedale Cemetery and when he meets the caretaker, Frankie pretends to be reporter and ask if anybody lately has been around Vicki’s grave. There were many flowers at the funeral, and the caretaker tells him that the grave’s been getting flowers each day since she died. Frankie learns where they were sent from, and goes to Keating Florist. It turns out the Larry sent them. Frankie confronts Larry who admits he was with Vicki the day she died. He had promised to send her flowers every day when she left for Hollywood, and he wanted to keep his word. Larry winds up giving Frankie a clue about the killer, and he goes to the old apartment and gets Mac to give him a half hour. He has a strong hunch.

The next scene is ripe with atmosphere when Frankie leans against the wall in Vicki’s old apartment. The lattice shadows fence Frankie in. Harry Williams is sleeping at the front desk. Vicki rings the desk and speaks in Vicki’s voice “Hello Harry, this is Vicki” He’s visibly shaken. Frankie watches his reaction. His eyes open wider as the buzzing mocks him, “Harry this is Vicki. Why did you do it Harry? Didn’t you love me?” Frankie confronts Williams. “You let yourself in with your pass key and waited for her. You loved her. She panicked and screamed.” William’s admits,  “I told the cop that when he chased me to Brooklyn. Cornell knew all along it was Williams. The dirty Cornell told him to just come back and keep his mouth shut. Mac hears the confession. Frankie tells him, he wants 5 minutes alone with Cornell.

He goes to his apartment finds a perverse and macabre shrine to Vicki. Her image is like a talisman in his sufficating little apartment. He discovers the prominent photograph of Vicki in an elaborate frame. Cornell unaware that Frankie is there, comes in and places fresh flowers underneath the photograph, as an offering. Frankie watches then emerges, “You knew. Why’d you want to fry me?”He tells Frankie, “I lost Vicki long before Williams killed her. You were the one who took her away from me” Cornell wanted to marry her. Had this furnished apartment set up. Bought her perfume. “Til he came along and put ideas in her head. She thought she was too good for me. He could had killed him then.” Frankie puts it to him, “Why didn’t ya?” “Cause I had the hook in your mouth and I wanted to see you suffer.”

Cornell resented Frankie’s closeness to Vicki, and inhabits a world that excludes him. In contrast to the suave Frankie Christopher, he is a lumbering and awkward outsider. To Cornell, Vicki will always be as unattainable as the first time he gazed upon her through the window. He was struck by her beauty, but she was completely and forever out of his reach. Cornell is like a lurking monster straight out of a classic horror movie. His uneasy presence lends to a surreal and menacing mood.

A Trailer a day keeps the Boogeyman away! I Wake Up Screaming (1941)

Continue reading “31 Flavors of Noir on the Fringe to Lure You In! Part 1”

Hedy Lamarr: From Ecstasy to Frequency! A Beautiful Life

The Heavenly Body 1944
The Heavenly Body 1944

“My mother always called me an ugly weed, so I never was aware of anything until I was older. Plain girls should have someone telling them they are beautiful. Sometimes this works miracles.”

“I must quit marrying men who feel inferior to me. Somewhere there must be a man who could be my husband and not feel inferior.”

“I appreciate subtlety. I have never enjoyed a kiss in front of the camera. There’s nothing to it except not getting your lipstick smeared.”

“I’m a sworn enemy of convention. I despise the conventional in anything, even the arts.”

Glamorous portrait of movie actress Hedy Lamarr wearing white fox fur short jacket.1938
Glamorous portrait of movie actress Hedy Lamarr wearing white fox fur short jacket. photo taken 1938

Hedy Lamarr  was born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler in Vienna, Austria on November 9th. Her first film was “Geld Auf Der Strase” (“Gold on the Street”) but it wasn’t until she appeared nude in the Czech film director Gustav Machatý‘s  visually provocative masterpiece Ekstasy” (“Ecstasy”) (1933) that she started causing ripples around the world. Ecstasy was banned in the U.S. because of that overly suggestive orgasm she so vividly reflects on screen.

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Adam (Aribert Mog) & Eva Hermann (Hedy Lamarr) in Extase 1933

As Eva Hermann Hedy Lamarr plays a young girl who marries a much older rigid man obviously suffering from a compulsive disorder. He doesn’t show her any form of physical affection at all in his ordered world. Left with no passion, no human contact, Eva feels cut off from the world and imprisoned by this loveless marriage. So she leaves and goes home to her father. While swimming in the lake, her horse runs off with her clothes! (thus the famous frontal nude scene as she swims and then runs for cover). Coming to her aide she meets a very sensual young man named Adam (Aribert Mog) and of course… there’s instant chemistry and the two fall in love.

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ecstasy 1933
ecstasy 1933

In the 2nd controversial part of the film, Adam & Eva make love in what I think is one of THE most erotic images in early cinema, also being one of the first on screen orgasms. As Eva’s heaving body is framed by the camera’s visually erotic rhythm. Eva/Hedy manifests a look on her face of… well. that just says she’s experiencing ECSTASY.

But her husband has become grief stricken and in a twist of fate discovers that his bride has become involved with the young man whom he fatefully happens to meet on the road one day… Outside the tavern where the young lovers dance and rejoice, the husband shoots himself.

There isn’t much dialogue, the film relies on the breathtaking visual narrative, as Eva journey’s to find release from her conflicted life. When you look beyond the whole infamous nude swimming scene that not only caused a sensation here in America, it dogged Hedy for years, what’s most significant is how much dimension Hedy conveyed without words.

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Hedy is in Ecstasy

In director John Cromwell’s marvelous film noir intrigue the beautiful Hedy Lamarr plays Gaby who falls for the romantic jewel thief Pepe Le Moko (Charles Boyer) while in the Casbah!

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Hedy Lamarr with Charles Boyer in Algiers (1938) Gaby: “It’s late. I must go” Pepe le Moko: “Suppose you don’t come tomorrow? “Gaby: “Suppose I don’t? Can’t you ever get away from the Casbah?” Pepe le Moko: “Why do you ask? Gaby: Can’t you?” Pepe le Moko: “No. I’m caught here, like a bear in a hole. Dogs barking, hunters all around, no way out of it. Do you like that? Maybe it’s lucky for you.” Gaby: “I don’t like it. And it’s not lucky.” Pepe le Moko: “You’re right. If you don’t come back, I might do anything. I might go down to your hotel to get you.” Gaby: “Tomorrow, Pepe”. Pepe le Moko: “Tomorrow?” Gaby: “I never break a promise.”
When Hedy made her Hollywood screen debut in Algiers (1938) she is photographed at a distance. As she approaches the camera hidden by the shadows of noir, it is when she slowly begins to walk off screen and suddenly turns directly toward the screen that her stunning close up became meteoric, and her mythological beauty was delivered to us with an intoxicating mystique. She was often typecast as the eternal vamp, the dangerous temptress, because of her mesmerizing persona.

Hedy had said, “My face is my misfortune… a mask I cannot remove. I must live with it. I curse it.”

Hedy Lamarr became known as the most beautiful woman in the world!

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Hedy Lamarr became known as the most beautiful woman in the world!
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in 1942 Lamarr spoke the words in White Cargo “I am Tondelayo.” setting the world afire with the flames of her mysterious sensuality.

In White Congo 1942, Lamarr is Tondelayo a captivating temptress. The story is about a love-hate triangle in the Congo in 1910. Harry Witzel (Walter Pidgeon), is a station superintendent, Langford (Richard Carlson), an English manager, and Hedy plays the beautiful Tondelayo. The two men fight over Tondelayo, who eventually uses her feminine wiles to lure in Langford. He marries her. But, she grows bored of him in a few months and pursues Harry. Harry refuses, reminding her of her wedding vows, so she obtains poison to get her husband out of the way. But Harry interferes and Tondelayo gets a taste of her own medicine.

Some of her motion pictures that have stirred me are, Lady of the Tropics (1939), I Take This Woman (1940) with Spencer Tracy, Comrade X (1940) with Clark Gable, Boom Town (1940) with Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy & Claudette Colbert. Come Live with Me (1941) a comedy/romance co-starring James Stewart, Ziegfeld Girl (1941) co-starring Judy Garland and James Stewart. Crossroads (1942) a fabulous film noir co-starring William Powell and Claire Trevor. In Tortilla Flat (1942) Lamarr plays ‘Dolores Sweets Ramirez’ alongside Spencer Tracy and John Garfield. And My Favorite Spy (1951) with Bob Hope!

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Bob Hope & Hedy in My Favorite Spy (1951)
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Spencer Tracy and Hedy in I Take This Woman (1940)
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Clark Gable & Hedy in Boom Town 1940
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Paul Lukas, Hedy Lamarr George Brent and Albert Dekker in Jacques Tourneur’s Experiment Perilous (1944)

In 1944 there was The Heavenly Body, The Conspirators and Experiment Perilous co-starring George Brent and Paul Lukas, directed by the great Jacques Tourneur.

Aside from Ecstasy (1933) in my view perhaps her most intoxicating performances were in 1946 & 1947. Hedy appeared in two suspenseful films, one starring George Sanders, The Strange Woman (1946), where she plays a ruthless seductress. The wild Jenny Hagar born in New England in the early 1800’s to a drunkard aspires for a life of luxury at any cost, driving Louis Hayward as Ephraim Poster to frenzied distraction, ultimately leading to a fateful end. George Sanders might be the only one who understands her free and strange spirit.

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Louis Hayward & Hedy in The Strange Woman 1946
The Strange Woman
Hedy Lamarr & George Sanders in Edgar G. Ulmer’s The Strange Woman (1946)

Hedy is intoxicating and multi-layered in Dishonored Lady (1947) she plays Madeleine Damien, along side husband to be John Loder as Felix Courtland. She is a high powered fashion editor who has a stressful job, gossiping chatter surrounding her and bad luck with men. Nearing a breakdown, she goes to a psychiatrist, literally when she crashes her car on his property. Dr. Richard Caleb (Morris Carnovsky) who advises her to quit her job, move, and assume a new identity and a ‘new soul’. She follows his advise, takes up painting, and falls in love with pathologist David Cousins (Dennis O’Keefe) who lives downstairs at the boarding house run by Mrs Geiger (Margaret Hamilton). But he finds out about her past when one of the men she dated before tries to frame her with a murder.

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Dr. Richard Caleb (Morris Carnovsky) offers to help Madeleine Damien (Hedy) in Dishonored Lady (1947)
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Felix Courtland (John Loder) is an absolute heel! in Dishonored Lady (1947)
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The great hat in Dishonored Lady 1947

Memorable Cecil B DeMille epic Samson and Delilah (1949) where this mesmerizing Philistine falls for the virile Samson (Victor Mature) but in the end she cuts off his, em… hair, yeah that’s it, hair. He is tortured, blinded, pulls down the temple around the people and well… never trust a dame who can woo the secret of your power off your lips especially when she has access to really sharp knives.

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Samson:The oldest trick in the world. Silk trap, baited with a woman.” Delilah: “You know a better bait, Samson? Men *always* respond.”

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Delilah

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In A Lady Without Passport (1950) as Marianne Lorress she co-stars with John Hodiak

So U.S. Immigration Service Agent Peter Karczag (John Hodiak) is sent to Havana to address the problem of foreign nationals coming to the U.S. through Cuba. He goes undercover as a Hungarian who wants to illegally immigrate to the U.S. and uncovers a human trafficking ring and a concentration camp for refugees. At the camp he falls in love with Marianne Lorries (Hedy Lamarr), who is also trying to enter the U.S. But if he does his job, she would be apprehended in the operation.

In Albert Zugsmith’s melodrama The Female Animal (1957) she plays an aging film star who competes with her daughter for the same man. The film co-stars Jane Powell and Jan Sterling.

Hedy Lamarr has played some of the most provocative women in her film career, yet her real life was just as filled with suspense and intrigue as that of her silver screen persona.

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Before coming to the U.S. while living in Austria in the early 1930’s Hedy married weapons mogul Friedrich Mandl. He treated her as his trophy wife, taking her to meetings with business associates (where she strategically listened & learned a lot about weapons technology) and using her to throw parties for the likes of Hitler and Mussolini. Friedrich imprisoned her— literally not letting her out of the house, warning servants to keep a watchful eye on her. Eventually, after a few attempts at leaving (he wouldn’t let her outside alone), Hedy drugged one of her maids, stole her clothing and was able to escape with all her jewelry to London in 1937. In 1938 she left London on the Normandie for America. On board she met MGM producer Louis B. Mayer who offered her a contract, insisting she work on her English accent and that she change her name (she was too much associated with the film Ecstasy). She chose Lamarr after silent film and stage actress Barbara La Marr.

She soon became a 1940s Hollywood sensation. MGM called her the “Most Beautiful Woman in the World.” In fact, later on she would become the archetypal model for Sean Young’s role as Rachel in Blade Runner (1982) and as CatWoman in Batman Returns (1992). In 1942 she was Hal Wallis’ first choice for Ingrid Bergman’s role in Casablanca.

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She made a fiery entrance when she walked onto the screen in Algiers (1938) with Charles Boyer. She started doing light romantic comedies with the likes of Jimmy Stewart (Come Live With Me 1941), Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy & Claudette Colbert in (Boom Town in 1940).

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Hedy with Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy & Claudette Colbert in Boom Town (1940)

In I Take This Woman 1940 Spencer Tracy’s character describes Georgi Gragore (Hedy)- Dr. Karl Decker: “She’s like something you see in a jeweler’s window. A single, flawless gem on a piece of black velvet. You take one long look and then you pass on.”

Hedy had 5 more husbands after Mandl. Bette Davis introduced her to one of her husbands, John Loder.

She wanted to be more than beautiful but they kept giving her the same roles with no substance. She hated that she was valued more for her looks than her intelligence.

While she was growing up, Hedy was privately tutored at home. Eventually she went to secondary all girls school in Vienna, focusing on mathematics and science. She was always more interested in staying home and reading Scientific American than in Hollywood parties and gossip. She had a room in her house devoted to engineering and wanted to contribute to the war effort by developing secret communications technology. When she did go to Hollywood parties, she always gravitated toward the geekiest party-goers. This is how she met avant-garde pianist and composer George Antheil.

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inventiondraft-frequency hopping.

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Hedy Lamarr with shipfitter Richard Spencer, as she tries to boost War Savings Bond sales by touring the Philadelphia Navy Yard in Pennsylvania circa 1940s
Hedy Lamarr with shipfitter Richard Spencer, as she tries to boost War Savings Bond sales by touring the Philadelphia Navy Yard in Pennsylvania
circa 1940s

Together, they decided to address the problem the Navy was having of using torpedoes against the German U-Boats and Japanese subs. Radio guiding systems only had one frequency, which could be found and jammed easily by the enemy. Inspired by her radio’s remote control, she worked with Antheil to develop something she called “frequency hopping.” The idea was that the guidance system and torpedoes would synchronize themselves on continually changing radio frequencies. In 1942 they signed over the patent to the U.S. Navy, where it sat unused until 1958. The idea was ahead of it’s time and the technology simply didn’t exist during the war. When the patent was used Spread Spectrum Frequency Hopping became a critical part of developing technologies we use every day— wifi, GPS and cell phone networks.

Hedy hated the Nazis and resolutely wanted to help the war effort. Despite her intelligence and knowledge of weapons technology, when she approached the Navy and wanted to help them win the war, they thought more of her celebrity and beauty and offered her a spot selling war bonds. She became one of the most successful sellers of war bonds, drawing crowds of 15,000-20,000 people in rallies all over the U.S. (people passed out and police had to control crowds when she attended a massive rally in Newark, NJ). She became a popular pin up girl, and regularly worked in the Hollywood Canteen, serving food to, and dancing with, service men before they headed overseas to the war. But Hedy truly wanted to contribute to the technology that would win the war. Unfortunately, she didn’t fit the dominant war paradigm— she was beautiful and her “place” was that of entertainer and not scientist. It wasn’t until the 1990s that she was recognized for her engineering achievements.

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 With all my love and great admiration to you, Hedy Lamarr

Quote of the Day! Between Two Worlds (1944)

“You’re dead… you boobs!” – Tom prior (John Garfield)

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS 1944

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Fantasy Melodrama based on Sutton Vane’s play Outward Bound. with a stellar ensemble cast directed by Edward A. Blatt starring John Garfield, Paul Henreid, Sydney Greenstreet, Eleanor Parker, Edmund Gwenn, George Tobias, George Coulouris Faye Emerson, Sara Algood, and Isobel Elsom.

A group of passengers aboard a ship are bound toward their destinies as they come to realize that they are all recently deceased…

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See ya between blog posts-MonsterGirl

A Trailer a day keeps the Boogeyman Away! Between Two Worlds (1944)

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS (1944)

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Produced by Jack L Warner and Mark Hellinger and directed by Edward A.Blatt, with a screenplay by Daniel Fuchs and based on Sutton Vanes play “Outward Bound” this story is a journey with an extraordinary ensemble cast, featuring John Garfield, Paul Henreid, Sydney Greenstreet, Eleanor. Parker, Edmund Gwenn, George Tobias, George Coulouris, Faye Emerson, and Isobel Elsom.

With an beautifully evocative score by Erich Wolfgang Korngold (Kings Row 1942,The Sea Wolf 1941)

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The film begins with an air raid during WWII, in which several people are unable to seek shelter. As the film transcends it’s earthly boundaries, it emerges as a mystical and melancholy tale of lost souls thrown together on a mysterious ship, trying to grasp the meanings of their lives, as they reflect and react to each other.

Aboard this strange ship which acts as a traveling Pergatory the players must wait and see if their final destination will either be heaven or hell, as their paths become clear to them, and they awaken to their final destinies.

Tom Prior: I read a great epitaph once, I’m gonna steal it for myself.
Scrubby: Sir?
Tom Prior: Here lies Prior, died a bachelor. Wifeless. Childless. Wish his father’d died the same.

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Here in this world, saying be happy-MonsterGirl