The Film Score Freak Recognizes: And little things between…

 Above photo of composer Dave Grusin

The art of film wouldn’t resonate without the language of music to help speak for it!

*And don’t think I forgot Jerry Goldsmith. He is my ultimate inspiration and will get a feature tribute all to himself!

*Billy Goldenberg

(Columbo episodes) Murder by the Book and Ransom for a dead man.

*Gil Mellé

The Sentinel 1977

Embryo 1976

Columbo episodes-Blueprint for Murder 1972, Short Fuse, Dead Weight and Death Lends a Hand

*Johnny Mandel

The Sandpiper 1965

*Dave Grusin

Columbo episode Presciption Murder (1968)

3 Days of the Condor 1973

The Nickel Ride 1974

*Michel Legrand

The Thomas Crown Affair 1968

Summer of ’42 (1971)

*Krzysztof Komeda

Rosemary’s Baby 1968 (courtesy of Soundtrack Fred)

*Jerry Fielding

The Enforcer 1976

The Mechanic 1972

The Big Sleep 1978

*Pino Dinaggio

Don’t Look Now 1973

*Francis Lai

live for life 1967

Bilitis 1977

The Forbidden Room 1977

*Colin Towns

The Haunting of Julia 1977 aka Full Circle

*Jaime Mendoza-Nave

The Brotherhood of Satan 1971

*Fred Myrow

Soylent Green 1973

*Waldo De Los Rios

The House that Screamed 1969

*David Raksin

Force of Evil 1948

The Big Combo 1955

Night Tide 1961

The Bad and the Beautiful 1952

*George Duning 

Picnic 1955

The Devil at 4 O’Clock 1961

*Ernest Gold

Ship of Fools 1965

*Maurice Jarre

Ash Wednesday 1973

Les yeux sans visage (1960)

*Alex North

A Streetcar Named Desire 1951

Hard Contract 1969

Shanks 1974 (courtesy of Goregirlsdungeon)

Spartacus 1960 love theme

The Children’s Hour 1961

*David Shire

Norma Rae 1979 “It goes like it goes”

The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974)

The Conversation 1974

*Quincy Jones

The Getaway 1972

*Michael Small

Klute 1971

The Stepford Wives 1975

Audrey Rose 1977

*Lalo Schifrin

The Fox 1967

Cool Hand Luke 1967

Prime Cut 1972

Bullitt 1968

*Ennio Morricone

The Sicilian Clan 1969

courtesy of Soundtrack of the Mind

Violent City 1970

*Kenyon Hopkins

12 Angy Men (1957)

*Ron Grainer

The Omega Man 1971

*John Carpenter

Escape from New York 1981

*Trevor Jones

courtesy of Soundtrack of the Mind

Labyrinth 1986

This is your EverLovin’ Joey sayin’ all the beautiful little things between – will always stay the same here at The Last Drive In!

 

The Film Score Freak – “like a circle in a spiral”

THE WINDMILLS OF YOUR MIND

One of the composers who has always been able to trace my heart to that sentimental place and transport my soul to a romantic kind of ache is Oscar-Winner Michel Legrand.

Norman Jewison (The Cincinnacti Kid (1965), In the Heat of the Night (1967) a gritty racially-charged detective story set in the South starring Sidney Poitier beat out Bonnie and Clyde and The Graduate at the Oscars! Another of Jewison’s visually moody films set as nihilistic cautionary tale is Rollerball (1975), And Justice for All (1979), Moonstruck 1987.) directs The Thomas Crown Affair (1968) which is Michel Legrand’s first American soundtrack and includes The Windmills of Your Mind with lyrics by Marilyn and Alan Bergman, performed by Noel Harrison (son of Rex Harrison). It’s an example of the moody romantic melodies you’ll discover in any of Legrand’s soundtracks.

I couldn’t help post this little flavor of music to sample, as I’ve been singing it all morning to my Siamese cat Daisy, while dreaming of the way the 60s decade in film flickered like a pale yellow haze, dreamy, sexy, languid, just for “Kicks” and romantic in it’s more subtle sensuality.

After watching a five hour rough cut of the film, composer Michel Legrand took a six week vacation during which he wrote 90 minutes of music. The film was then reedited to the music, instead of the other way around. If this experiment had failed, Legrand would have written a second score in the traditional way free of charge.

Windmills is an exquisitely evocative melody with lyrics like poetry that shares an intimate partnership with the story, dancing alongside the stunning Faye Dunaway featuring her gazillion fashion changes (Theodora Van Runkle who designed the costumes for Dunaway’s Bonnie and Clyde 1967) and Steve McQueen with his restrained spirit in an arousing stylized cat & mouse heist caper. McQueen plays an independently wealthy bank robber and Dunaway is the insurance investigator on his tail, literally.

Hopefully you’ll vibe on this a bit of Legrand’s genius, and I dare you to listen just once and be able to get it out of your head the rest of the day! Like a circle in a spiral…

Your EverLovin’ Joey sayin’ circle back to The Last Drive In again!